Category: Schools

Air pollution to be monitored at 22 schools in Newcastle, UK

AQMesh air quality monitor being installed in NewcastleA network of sensors has been set up in Newcastle in order to give policymakers a more accurate picture of the air being breathed by children.

The project is a collaboration with Newcastle University and Newcastle City Council who have installed 22 air pollution sensors outside schools that are located close to major roads.

The data will be collected by Newcastle University’s Urban Observatory, the team will then use this information to help engage the children who are being directly affected and give them a voice as to how their cities should be planned in the future.

The Urban Observatory is the UK’s largest urban experiment collecting data about 60 different urban indicators, everything from energy use, rainfall and flooding to air pollution and traffic flow.

Currently, the Urban Observation has deployed over 3,600 sensors across Newcastle, including AQMesh air quality monitoring systems*, adding 5,000 new observations ever minute.

Eugene Milne, director of public health at Newcastle City Council said: ‘Poor air quality harms everybody’s health, and young people are among those most at risk, so we’re very pleased to be working with the University and young people across the city to address this.’

‘As well as raising awareness of the issues, the project will also aim to encourage more active travel and fewer car journeys, particularly on the school run.’

‘This project will help us to monitor just how much pollution is in the air around schools and enable us to get views of the children who are directly affected on what else could be done to tackle the problem.’

Sean Peacock, who is based in Newcastle University’s Open Lab has said: ‘Children themselves are far from oblivious to the impact that air pollution is having on their health and their futures.’

‘The school climate strike shows that young people are forcing air pollution and the climate crisis to the top of the political agenda.’

‘Urban planners and politicians are often hesitant to work with children, but they shouldn’t be.’

‘We need to embrace their creativity and passion to take radical action on air pollution and climate change. More, now than ever, we need the original ideas that only children can bring.’

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All of the data is freely available at Newcastle University’s website: www.urbanobservatory.ac.uk, and is being used by researchers, local authorities, regulators, developers, town planners, businesses and members of the public.

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*Original news published in September 2018.

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MPCA publishes local air quality data from AQMesh

AQMesh air quality monitor in MinnesotaMinnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) has been monitoring Minnesota’s air quality for a number of years, and it is generally considered to be good. However, MPCA wanted to understand how air pollution varies across small distances in order to minimise vulnerable communities’ exposure to harmful pollutants.

Following project funding* in 2017, earlier this year MPCA successfully installed AQMesh pods across 44 sites in neighbourhoods around Minneapolis and St. Paul, primarily on lampposts in school parking lots, with at least one pod in each ZIP code.

MPCA gives high priority to community involvement and sharing its air quality data with the public. It has launched an online tool allowing citizens to compare pollution levels at different monitoring sites over a given date range. Monika Vadali, Ph.D, who is leading the project, welcomes feedback on the online tool and the wider project and is looking forward to hearing comments from communities where monitoring is taking place.

AQMesh monitoring air quality in Minnesota

Prior to being deployed across Minneapolis and St. Paul, the AQMesh pods were co-located against the FEM station at Blaine airport for a number of months in order for the readings to be compared and validated, and for scaling to be applied if necessary. During the co-location period AQMesh showed high levels of pod-to-pod precision, with an average R2 of 0.94 for NO2, despite extreme weather conditions.

For the next two years, the AQMesh pods will monitor and report data on levels of NO2, O3, NO, SO2, CO, PM2.5 and PM10 in 44 areas of Minneapolis and St. Paul to build up a picture of air quality across the cities. Scientists at MPCA will use the data to determine if there are any significant differences in the concentration of pollutants between ZIP codes, if there are any areas with unusually high levels of pollution, and if technology such as AQMesh is suitable for measuring such small variations in air quality.

The study is similar to the Breathe London project in the UK, where 100 AQMesh pods have been deployed across London to publish a real-time map of the city’s air pollution, which has now also been launched online.

For more information about the MPCA project, please contact Monika on (+1) 651-757-2776.

*This is a legislative funded LCCMR project, with support provided by the Environment and natural resources trust fund (Subd. 07 Air Quality, Climate Change, and Renewable Energy ENRTF # 07b).

Partners and collaborators include the city of Minneapolis, the city of St. Paul, Minnesota Department of Health, Minnesota State University-Mankato, and Xcel Energy.

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Learn more about the Assessing Urban Air Quality project.

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AQMesh used by Glasgow schools aiming to reduce vehicle pollution

AQMesh used in Glasgow by schools aiming tor reduce traffic pollutionSchools near Glasgow have been monitoring air quality as part of a project aiming to reduce the levels of pollution emitted by vehicles as they drop off and collect children. The project is part of a ‘Beat the Street’ initiative that was granted £50,000 from a new £1million fund to increase walking, cycling and sustainable travel in Scotland. The overall aim is to cut Scotland’s carbon emissions, improve air quality, reverse the trend towards sedentary lifestyles and tackle health inequalities.

The Environmental Health department of East Renfrewshire Council supplied and installed the three AQMesh air quality monitoring pods that were utilised in the project. The monitoring activity followed initiatives in eight schools organised with SEPA, in which the children designed their own air quality banners as part of a competition.

The banners were then placed outside the schools which were then monitored for two weeks with an AQMesh pod measuring a variety of parameters including nitrogen dioxide – one of the pollutants of greatest concern. The Council’s Richard Mowat said: “We used one of our own AQMesh pods and rented the other two from Air Monitors. The pods are small and easy to install so we were able to locate them close to the areas most affected by parents’ vehicles.

“The results clearly showed significant peaks in pollution during the drop-off periods and it was pleasing to note how well the project was received. We hope that this work will help educate the children and that they, in turn, will encourage their parents to leave the cars at home and walk whenever possible.”

Anne-Marie Absolom is Head Teacher at one of the participating schools – St Clares Primary School. She said: “Our Junior Road Safety Officers, and all of the school staff, are delighted that we have had the opportunity to install temporary air quality monitors in our car park.

“We have been campaigning throughout the year to improve air quality in and around our school. The children have also been learning about the small changes that they can make – changes that will make a big difference to the quality of the air we breathe.

“The results from the monitors have highlighted the specific times of day at which air pollution is most significant, and the Junior Road Safety Officers are now campaigning at these times. The data gathered has been shared with all children in the school and they are passionate about spreading the word and ensuring that air pollution is reduced.”

As well as supplying the monitoring equipment for the project, Air Monitors also provided sponsorship funds for the school banners, and this was reflected in a stunning night-time time display on the roof of Glasgow’s famous SEC Armadillo, organised by SEPA. A variety of images relating to air quality were projected on to the Armadillo’s roof, highlighting for example Clean Air Day 2019, as well as the Air Monitors logo.

SEPA’s Dr Colin Gillespie said: “It has been great to work again with Air Monitors and the councils, raising awareness in air quality around schools, promoting active changes to reduce pollution and encouraging pupils to think about more sustainable forms of travel.”

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AQMesh used by Guardian journalists in the UK to highlight air quality risks in London

Supporting the aims of Clean Air Day  today, 20th June 2019, the Guardian has published a short film demonstrating the changing levels of pollution that children are exposed to as they walk to school in London. The film can be viewed here.

The Guardian Cities team worked closely with their colleagues in multimedia to create a film showing real-time air quality data as a mother takes her young children to school in north London. The video features mother-of-two Natasa pushing a pram and walking her daughter along Marylebone Road, with a Particles Plus instrument attached to the pram and an AQMesh pod on her daughter’s backpack.

The most important air quality parameters are displayed on-screen during the walk, with data including PM10, PM2.5 and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). The film producers have cleverly integrated the European yearly mean limits for these parameters into the display, with readings changing from blue to red when they exceed the limit, (which for PM10 and NO2 was most of the time!).

Documentary producer Anetta Jones, said: “Air quality is a vitally important issue for the health and wellbeing of city dwellers, but the main pollution threats are invisible, so we hope that initiatives such as this will help residents and visitors to better understand the threat that they face.”

The monitoring equipment was supplied by Air Monitors Limited. Their David Green said: “We have recently installed large numbers of AQMesh pods all over London as part of the Breathe London project, and data from these pods will be displayed on the project website. However, video is an enormously popular medium, and it is really exciting to see what can be achieved when the latest technologies in multimedia and air quality monitoring combine.”

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The Breathe London project.

How clean is your local air?

AQMesh indoor and outdoor air quality monitorFew people know how clean the air is where they live, work, exercise or where their children go to school. Although air quality can be shown to vary significantly over short distances, air pollution is generally measured using a small number of large, expensive and high quality monitoring stations. The equipment used in these stations is very accurate and complies with measurement standards but they are expensive to buy and maintain, as well as difficult to position because of their size and infrastructure requirements.

With most cities having a single figure number of reference stations at best, many neighbourhoods do not have access to regular and localised air quality information. Historically, the best solution currently is to fill the gaps through modelling, which combines available air quality readings with other information such as emissions inventory.

Demand from communities for better local air quality information is coming at a time when development of smaller, cheaper air quality sensors can provide a solution to the challenge. ‘Small sensor’ air quality systems can provide highly localised pollution measurements, including nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and the key particulate matter measurement, PM2.5, but to provide meaningful measurements on which communities and authorities can make decisions, the information must show traceability to reference measurements.

Many initiatives around the world are aiming to show what can be done, with one of the most ambitious being the Breathe London project in London. 100 small sensor systems are being used, in combination with data from London’s reference network, modelling and readings taken by Google cars modified to carry high quality air monitoring equipment. This project aims to demonstrate how such a ‘hyper-local’ network can be managed, creating a template which can be rolled out to other cities worldwide.

Similarly, 50 AQMesh small sensor air quality monitoring units have been installed to monitor air quality in each of the 50 zip codes in Minneapolis – Saint Paul, USA. “This project is about understanding small-scale differences in air pollution in urban areas in order to minimise exposure to harmful air pollutants, particularly for vulnerable communities. The Assessing Urban Air Quality project will use new air monitoring sensors to broaden our knowledge about air quality in Minneapolis and St. Paul”, commented Monika Vadali, Ph.D, who is leading the project.

AQMesh has also been used to monitor air quality around industrial sites and next to nearby communities which may be affected. As the monitoring units can be positioned with a high degree of flexibility, such as mounting on a lamp post, it is possible to capture data at exactly the point required. With measurements usually every 15 minutes, combined with local wind speed and direction information, it is possible to build up a highly localised picture of likely pollution exposure and identification of pollution sources.

Whilst regulatory authorities are currently defining testing methodologies to help users choose small sensor air quality systems, the best small sensor systems provide a useful and practical tool to supplement existing monitoring networks and are in active use around the world, providing new information about local air quality for a range of applications.

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AQMesh used to measure local air quality at Surrey school

Cleves School in Weybridge, Surrey (UK) has used AQMesh to measure pollution at the primary school’s entrance. The project, led by Dr. Edward Salter over the school’s summer term, aimed to understand exposure of the children (aged 7-11) to dangerous pollutant gases, with particular interest in the levels of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3).

Initial findings showed that levels of O3 exceeded 100µg/m3 on several occasions during the high temperatures in June, and a daily pattern of gas peaks coinciding with school pick-up and drop-off was noticeable for nitric oxide (NO). NO2 levels increased later in the day both as a result of oxidation of school-related NO and from general traffic locally, with elevated levels of NO2 up to the end of the evening commute, probably from traffic on local and major roads nearby. The monitoring also showed 15-30 minute spikes from diesel buses or cars parked very early in the morning or late at night with their engines running constantly, as well as from local events at the weekend, when the air quality is otherwise generally seen to improve considerably.

The project set out to determine whether pollution peaked at school drop-off and pick-up times in order to encourage cleaner methods of getting to and from school, after a transport assessment for the expansion of the school highlighted that traffic peaked around 8.30am and 3.15pm for approximately 30 minutes. The school is reviewing findings and will consider a number of mitigation measures, including timing exercise sessions for periods of lower pollution.

AQMesh monitors were installed to monitor NO, NO2, NOx and O3 at each school gate during these peak traffic periods. “There is clearly an effect between pollution levels and travelling to school by car. If I were to do this again I would ask to monitor to additional gases, VOCs and particulates”, said Dr. Edward Salter. AQMesh can currently measure PM1, PM2.5, PM10, CO and SO2, as well as the three gases in this study, and options for H2S and CO2 are due to be released by the end of 2017.

“The AQMesh pods were simple enough for the school to handle, which is not true of all such equipment”, added Dr. Salter.

AQMesh was designed to offer a robust and easy-to-use air quality monitoring system that can deliver localised real-time readings, improving the accuracy and scope of gathering air quality data in order to support initiatives to reduce air pollution and its risk to human health.

AQMesh has been used in various education-related projects globally. At the simplest level AQMesh offers an accessible way for schoolchildren to engage with local air quality issues. Used in conjunction with wind speed and direction information, local real-time data from AQMesh can be used to distinguish between local sources of pollution, which can be managed, and more distant sources of pollution which require a different approach. AQMesh data can also be used to improve the accuracy of air quality models at the local level.

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