Category: Health and safety

AQMesh shows high accuracy local ozone readings across global locations

AQMesh shows high accuracy for measuring ozone across global locationsAQMesh has been measuring ozone (O3) using small sensors since 2011 and the readings from the latest generation electrochemical sensor, using AQMesh v4.2.3 processing, as compared to co-located certified reference readings, consistently show an R2 of over 0.9 with an accuracy ±10ppb (20µg/m3).

AQMesh pods have been measuring ozone levels around the world and co-location comparison studies show very good performance against reference equipment from the latest sensor and processing version. Ozone levels have been particularly high across Western Europe over this summer but are a regular concern in many parts of the world, including the USA. However, there are huge gaps between O3 monitoring points, to different degrees across the world, depending on monitoring equipment budgets. A lower cost small-sensor monitoring solution can provide valuable data within the areas currently lacking in this air quality information. Data validity is typically demonstrated by comparison with a local reference station, although AQMesh is also widely used where no reference data is available.

O3 at ground level is formed by reactions with nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from traffic and industrial emissions in the presence of sunlight. As such, hotter, sunnier weather can dramatically increase O3 pollution.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) currently states the daily limit of O3 levels to be 100μg/m3 over an 8-hour mean and advise that prolonged exposure to high levels of O3 can have severe effects on human health, including causing asthma, inflammation of the airways, reduced lung functionality and lung disease. Measuring O3 as a part of an air quality monitoring routine is therefore becoming increasingly important, especially in hotter climates and areas of increased VOC emissions.

O3 can be complicated to measure due to its high sensitivity to environmental conditions and cross-gas effects. Most small sensors for measuring O3 are either electrochemical or metal oxide, but electrochemical sensors (such as those used in AQMesh) have the advantage of low power requirements and can therefore be installed more flexibly. AQMesh pods are compact, wireless units and are available with a variety of power options, including solar panels, which allow them to be installed exactly where monitoring needs to take place.

During summer 2018 AQMesh has been measuring ozone at hundreds of locations across five continents and co-location comparisons show consistently high levels of accuracy. To quote two of many such studies, in an industrial region of the USA, AQMesh O3 measurements compared to FEM gave an R2 of 0.97, and in a similar comparison study in Western Europe the R2 value for O3 was 0.95. AQMesh pods measuring gases can run continuously for over two years using a battery but other power options are available, including solar. Particulate matter (TPC, PM1, PM2.5, PM10) can also monitored with an AQMesh pod, alongside gases including NO, NO2, O3, CO, SO2, CO2 and H2S, as well as pod temperature, RH% and pressure.

The accuracy of AQMesh readings has been proven through an extensive series of global co-location comparison trials and is the proven, commercially available low-cost air quality monitoring system for both pollutant gases and particulate matter, as well as simultaneously monitoring a range of environmental conditions.

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Car-free Cardiff achieves 69% air quality improvement

AQMesh helps Cardiff achieve 69% air quality improvementOn Sunday 13th May 2018, Cardiff Council organised a car-free day in the city’s central area. As a result of this event air quality monitoring data showed an average 69% drop in nitrogen dioxide (NO2) – one of the pollutants of greatest public health concern. Seeking a better understanding of the relationship between air quality and traffic, Cardiff Council hired three AQMesh air quality monitoring pods from Air Monitors Ltd. The instruments were located on streets impacted by the day’s event, and within two of the Councils Air Quality Management Areas (AQMAs); City Centre & Stephenson Court, Newport Road. The instruments continuously recorded air quality at these locations for 20 days before, during and after the event.

“In comparing the results obtained during the Car Free Day Event with results from the following Sunday (20th May) , the monitor on Duke Street showed an 87% reduction in nitrogen dioxide, the monitor in Westgate Street showed an 84% reduction and the third monitor, which was located less centrally from the main road closures, in Stephenson Court, showed a 36% reduction,” commented a Specialist Services Officer, working for Shared Regulatory Services (SRS) on behalf of Cardiff Council . “Comparing the car-free datasets with those of the following Sunday (20th May); the daily average nitrogen dioxide levels recorded by two of the monitors situated within the City Centre AQMA exceeded the EU yearly average limit (40 µg/m3), but on the car-free day, these two monitors measured daily average figures of just 5 and 8µg/m3 of nitrogen dioxide, providing clear evidence that air pollution in Cardiff city centre is generated by traffic.”

Under the European Ambient Air Quality Directive, Welsh Ministers have a duty to ensure that compliance with air quality objectives defined within the directive is achieved. As outlined in Defra’s UK Action Plan for tackling roadside nitrogen dioxide concentrations, July 2017, modelling has indicated that certain road networks in Cardiff fail to meet EU air quality requirements. Cardiff Council has been directed by Welsh Government to undertake a feasibility study, in order to demonstrate how compliance with the directive and its specified limits will be achieved in the shortest time possible. In order to implement air quality interventions, the Council therefore needs to evaluate the sources of pollution so that appropriate interventions can be assessed to ensure that effective mitigation measures can be implemented. At the same time, it will be necessary to engage with citizens to ensure that they appreciate the importance of tackling air pollution.

AQMesh helps Cardiff achieve 69% air quality improvementNitrogen dioxide and particulates are the main cause of failures to meet EU air quality limits in cities around the world, and it is well known that traffic, and diesel vehicles in particular, are a major source of these pollutants. The AQMesh pods measure a range of gases including nitrogen dioxide, so by monitoring the effect of removing traffic, the Council will be in a better position to implement improvement measures.

Two automatic air quality monitoring stations are located in Cardiff, and the Council supplements the data from these monitors with a network of non-automatic passive diffusion tubes. However, the Specialist Services Officer from SRS says: “The fixed stations can’t provide street-level monitoring at the most sensitive locations, and the use of diffusion tubes does not provide a detailed understanding of daily trends as they only provide a monthly average figure. However, SRS are aware of the capabilities of the AQMesh pods and are familiar with the accuracy and flexibility that they are able to deliver, which is why they were chosen for the car-free day project.”

In order to assure the quality of the monitoring data, the AQMesh pods that were employed during the project were checked against a reference station and were found to have performed very well. “The pods are small, lightweight and battery-powered which makes them quick and easy to deploy,” the Specialist Services Officer adds. “This is crucial to our work because it gives us the ability to site them on lamp posts so that they measure the air that people are breathing. In addition, they are web-enabled which means that we can monitor air quality in almost real-time; providing a unique insight into the specific events that impact air quality.”

It has been estimated that around 40,000 people in the UK die prematurely as a result of air pollution, mainly in the larger towns and cities. In Wales, the urban areas exceeding EU limits include Cardiff, Swansea, Port Talbot, Newport, Chepstow and Wrexham.

Following completion of the monitoring work in Cardiff, SRS has had requests for the data from a number of organisations, and are keen for the work to be publicised as widely as possible. Highlighting the importance of citizen engagement, the SRS Specialist Services Officer says: “A wide variety of potential measures are available to combat air pollution in Cardiff, but many involve inconvenience for members of the public and cost to the public purse, so we need those affected to be on-board with the measures being taken. We are also hoping that the public will be keen to help, by participating in car-share schemes for example.”

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Visit UK AQMesh distributor Air Monitors Ltd.

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Traffic pollution in office buildings drives innovative indoor-outdoor air quality management

AQMesh small sensor air quality monitoring system measuring indoor air qualityExtensive research has shown that indoor air quality is often worse than outdoors. Closed system buildings trap harmful particles inside, and external air intakes can bring in more polluted air from outside.

Whilst many heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems (HVAC) use particle filtering, managed through air exchanges, they can often worsen levels of polluting gases, such as NO2 – now classified by the World Health Organisation as a Class 1 carcinogen. Natural ventilation systems have no particulate filtration at all, and buildings are also frequently completely shut up all night with no ventilation running, trapping the pollution that has built up over the day.

Unlike outdoor air quality (which the government is responsible for), indoor air quality is the responsibility of the building owner or manager, and with research proving that poor air quality has a significant impact on human health, air pollution should be a key factor of employee health & safety.

Future Decisions has teamed up with AQMesh and UK distributor, Air Monitors Ltd, to supply pollution mitigation to improve indoor air quality. Future Decisions has developed patented smart management strategies that aim to reduce internal air pollution by 30% – this is usually enough to bring the air quality within UK & EU regulatory levels, and often within the World Health Organisation levels.

AQMesh measures NO, NO2, O3, NOx, CO, CO2, SO2, PM1, PM2.5, PM10, temperature, pressure and relative humidity in a small pod which can be mounted both indoors and outdoors on a wall or post. Batteries, solar power and DC power options give flexibility of mounting anywhere. AQMesh was designed to offer an easy-to-use air quality monitoring system that can deliver localised real-time readings, improving the accuracy and scope of gathering air quality data in order to support initiatives to reduce air pollution and its risk to human health.

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More about pollution mitigation from Future Decisions.

Visit UK AQMesh distributor Air Monitors Ltd.

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Upplands Motor in Stockholm compares air quality indoor and outdoor

Two AQMesh pods were used to measure NO, NO2, O3 and CO during May and June 2017 at Upplands Motor Stockholm AB car dealership in Sweden, located on the highway between Stockholm city centre and Arlanda airport. The objective was to measure the air quality outside and inside the combined showroom and workshop, demonstrating the importance of measuring common traffic-related pollutants indoors as well as outdoors. The project was also to assess the suitability of AQMesh for this application, including ease of installation and relocation.

The car dealer is situated immediately next to a major highway and the premises are used for car servicing and repairs as well as sales. The air in the building is managed using a standard heating and ventilation management system which ensures adequate air exchange when the building is in operation.

One of the pods was moved indoors between 9th May and 9th June – this can be clearly seen in the temperature plot comparison for both pods during May and June (the pod moved indoors is shown by the blue line on the plot below). The indoor unit showed significantly elevated levels of NO and CO indoors during that time, compared to the unit which remained outside. Although the NO levels indoors largely tracked the outdoor levels, they were consistently around 40-50ppb higher. This may be because the ventilation system is not adequately exchanging air indoors, as the ventilation system in the building is activated at 7am and stops at 6pm when the dealer closes for the day.

The AQMesh pods were then mounted together outdoors again at the end of the indoor trial, clearly showing that the units continued to agree with each other when measuring in the same space, with a pod-to-pod R2 of over 0.8.

 

 

Whilst many heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems (HVAC) focus on CO2 measurement – managed through air exchanges – and particle filtration, they can actually make levels of common pollution gases, such as NO2, worse. Air intakes may be situated where outdoor air quality is poor, such as in a car park or near a road, air intake is often during busy traffic periods, and HVAC systems may be switched off just as outdoor air is clearing, trapping pollution indoors overnight.

With diesel exhaust fumes – which include NO2 – now classified as a class 1 carcinogen by the World Health Organisation, forward-thinking companies, such as Upplands Motor, are becoming the first to understand these issues and are focusing on management of indoor air to ensure that the air quality for their workers is at least better than outdoors. AQMesh can also quantify exposure of employees to NO2 and other pollutants when working outdoors, such as on civil engineering sites, directing traffic, or driving a bus.

AQMesh was designed to offer an easy-to-use air quality monitoring system that can deliver localised real-time readings, improving the accuracy and scope of gathering air quality data in order to support initiatives to reduce air pollution and its risk to human health. It continues to be proven as a reliable and accurate instrument for monitoring air quality, whether indoors or outdoors.

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Learn more about AQMesh.

More on indoor outdoor air quality monitoring from UK AQMesh distributor, Air Monitors Ltd.

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AQMesh used to measure local air quality at Surrey school

Cleves School in Weybridge, Surrey (UK) has used AQMesh to measure pollution at the primary school’s entrance. The project, led by Dr. Edward Salter over the school’s summer term, aimed to understand exposure of the children (aged 7-11) to dangerous pollutant gases, with particular interest in the levels of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3).

Initial findings showed that levels of O3 exceeded 100µg/m3 on several occasions during the high temperatures in June, and a daily pattern of gas peaks coinciding with school pick-up and drop-off was noticeable for nitric oxide (NO). NO2 levels increased later in the day both as a result of oxidation of school-related NO and from general traffic locally, with elevated levels of NO2 up to the end of the evening commute, probably from traffic on local and major roads nearby. The monitoring also showed 15-30 minute spikes from diesel buses or cars parked very early in the morning or late at night with their engines running constantly, as well as from local events at the weekend, when the air quality is otherwise generally seen to improve considerably.

The project set out to determine whether pollution peaked at school drop-off and pick-up times in order to encourage cleaner methods of getting to and from school, after a transport assessment for the expansion of the school highlighted that traffic peaked around 8.30am and 3.15pm for approximately 30 minutes. The school is reviewing findings and will consider a number of mitigation measures, including timing exercise sessions for periods of lower pollution.

AQMesh monitors were installed to monitor NO, NO2, NOx and O3 at each school gate during these peak traffic periods. “There is clearly an effect between pollution levels and travelling to school by car. If I were to do this again I would ask to monitor to additional gases, VOCs and particulates”, said Dr. Edward Salter. AQMesh can currently measure PM1, PM2.5, PM10, CO and SO2, as well as the three gases in this study, and options for H2S and CO2 are due to be released by the end of 2017.

“The AQMesh pods were simple enough for the school to handle, which is not true of all such equipment”, added Dr. Salter.

AQMesh was designed to offer a robust and easy-to-use air quality monitoring system that can deliver localised real-time readings, improving the accuracy and scope of gathering air quality data in order to support initiatives to reduce air pollution and its risk to human health.

AQMesh has been used in various education-related projects globally. At the simplest level AQMesh offers an accessible way for schoolchildren to engage with local air quality issues. Used in conjunction with wind speed and direction information, local real-time data from AQMesh can be used to distinguish between local sources of pollution, which can be managed, and more distant sources of pollution which require a different approach. AQMesh data can also be used to improve the accuracy of air quality models at the local level.

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Learn more about AQMesh.

Visit UK AQMesh distributor Air Monitors Ltd.

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Assess employee air pollution exposure with AQMesh

AQMesh checks employee pollution exposureOn 9th April The Sunday Times reported that employers have been told they are legally obliged to protect their staff from diesel fumes — and could be sued if workers develop cancer later in life. Read the full article here.

Employers who want to assess risk to employees can use AQMesh to take round-the-clock readings of a range of measurements including key pollutants NO2 and PM2.5. The small, battery-powered devices transmit data using the mobile phone network and data can be accessed using a secure online login.

The Sunday Times article is based on a reclassification of diesel fumes as a “grade 1 carcinogen” by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, part of the World Health Organisation, after it found that people exposed to diesel fumes at work were up to 40% more likely to develop cancer.

The Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (IOSH) and Health and Safety Executive (HSE) have issued the warnings and as many as 500,000 UK jobs may be affected. Clearly it is not just UK workers who are affected by diesel fumes in the workplace. Employees with jobs that could involve high exposure to diesel fumes are any who spend much of their time on or close to busy roads or railways, or near running diesel engines or generators.

Studies with AQMesh have shown high exposure to NO2 and particulate matter inside vehicles such as taxis and also inside office buildings. Although buildings often have active air management to reduce CO2 levels, air intakes can be positioned such that they draw in air from a highly polluted area. Particles may be filtered out but without knowing how levels of the invisible, odourless pollutant NO2 are potentially building up, it is very difficult to manage indoor air quality. Read more…

Employers may be required to take action, including practical advice for employees to minimise exposure. However, exposure can vary dramatically depending on location – inside or outside a vehicle or building – time of day, day of the week, etc. For employers to understand the risk presented to employees and to take appropriate action, it is straightforward to assess air quality very close to the point at which employees are inhaling air.

The best quality data about air pollution comes from reference stations, using validated equipment. However, such stations are large, immobile and require power and communications infrastructure. AQMesh can be located in a fixed position to monitor a workplace on an ongoing basis, such as inside a facility, next to a professional driver or on a fence next to a construction team. AQMesh can be calibrated against reference instruments to establish reading validity. Further advice about management of AQMesh data is available from www.airmonitors.co.uk.

 

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