Category: Data validity

Latest AQMesh co-location studies show capability of small sensor systems

AQMesh air quality monitor and new solar panel power optionRecent co-location comparison trials against certified reference equipment continue to prove AQMesh performance and reliability for localised air quality monitoring.

Trials in the USA, UK and Western Europe this year have delivered high correlation coefficients (R2 values) for key pollutants such as nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5). An R2 value of 0.92 against reference for O3 was achieved in Southern USA over the Summer, as well as an R2 value of 0.94 against reference for NO2 in Northern USA during the cold season.

Co-location trials for AQMesh and field equivalent methods have been taking place globally for several years, with the results published on the AQMesh website, demonstrating how performance and accuracy continues to improve with each new version of the product. A number of independent studies have also been carried out, verifying the AQMesh system’s capability.

AQMesh is a small sensor air quality monitoring system for measuring pollutant gases and particles in ambient air. It is a flexible, quick to install and easy to use air quality monitor that can deliver localised, real-time readings, aiming to improve the spatial resolution, scope and accuracy of gathering air quality data.

Its range of wireless power options includes a recently improved smart solar panel, which is now larger than the previous and has a more efficient charge, allowing for year-round operation for standard gas and particulate AQMesh pods across Western Europe and regions on a similar latitude.

AQMesh pods can now monitor up to 6 gases out of NO, NO2, NOx, O3, CO, SO2, CO2 and H2S using the latest generation of sensors, as well as PM1, PM2.5, PM10 and total particle count (TPC) with a light-scattering optical particle counter. In addition to pollutants, AQMesh can measure noise, relative humidity, pod temperature and atmospheric pressure, all within a single compact unit. Data is completely secure on the AQMesh cloud server, only accessible by a secure login, which allows the user to manage their pods, view customisable graphical data, and download the data for further analysis.

AQMesh is currently in use throughout the world in a variety of air quality monitoring applications and projects, including smart city networks, indoor-outdoor air quality management, employee health and safety, traffic pollution mitigation studies and air quality modelling. Recent case studies show it forming part of a major ‘hyperlocal’ street-by-street monitoring system throughout London (UK), as well as being used in a similar project across 50 zip code areas in Minnesota (USA).

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Learn more about AQMesh.

Browse AQMesh co-location comparison trial results.

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AQMesh shown to achieve highest correlation coefficients in new ACS paper

A new paper published by the American Chemical Society (ACS Sensors) reviews the use of amperometric electrochemical gas sensors for monitoring inorganic gases that affect urban air quality. Written by John Saffell and Ronan Baron of Alphasense, the paper gives a full explanation of how the sensors work, how they have developed and a review of how they have been used. Key relevant studies are summarised as well as major studies using the sensors.

The paper mentions AQMesh as ‘the first provider of integrated air quality networks’ using the Alphasense sensors, and also refers to AQMesh correction algorithms (the authors consider data correction necessary) and the comparison field trials published regularly on the AQMesh website. University of Cambridge, Citi-Sense and IDAD projects, which used AQMesh, are mentioned: of the range of sensor systems submitted for the 2 week field comparisons trial in Aveiro, ‘The AQMesh unit achieved the highest correlation coefficient and the lowest mean absolute errors: R2 was 0.70 for O3, 0.89 for NO2, 0.86 for CO and 0.80 for NO. Other sensor boxes were unable to provide the same degree of correlation, possibly because of the lack of data correction for temperature variations.’

View the abstract here and register for access to the full paper.

Further reading – Assessment of air quality microsensors versus reference methods: The EuNetAir joint exercise.

Professor Rod Jones’ presentation on large scale deployment of sensors

At the IAPSC in May 2017, Professor Rod Jones of the University of Cambridge presented his case study on large scale deployment of sensors, which included showing how AQMesh can be used to discriminate between local sources of pollution and regional sources of pollution.

The study also found how modelling captures the magnitude of an event, but not the timing, and concluded that AQMesh captures spatial gradients very well.

Read the full presentation

Find out more about AQMesh in Cambridge

New AQMesh co-location comparisons show very strong correlation values

Recent co-location comparison trials using the latest AQMesh processing (v4.2.3) have further proven AQMesh performance with impressive R2 values in excess of O.8 and 0.9 for NO2 in Benelux, Slovakia and Spain.

Particulate matter (PM2.5) was also monitored throughout the Slovakia trial and delivered an R2 value of 0.98.

Correlation values for NO continue to be high throughout all AQMesh co-location trials, with results exceeding 0.9 in nearly all cases.

For more information on co-location trials and performance please contact us.

AQMesh complements air quality modelling, reference equipment and indicative data sources

Leading small sensor air quality monitor, AQMesh, has recently been shown to work alongside passive samplers and air quality models, as well as complementing reference station networks. A recent study shows AQMesh calibration against diffusion tubes and two 2017 conferences have highlighted the potential of such systems used in an air quality network.

At the Dispersion Modellers User Group Meeting (DMUG, London, April 2017), CERC showed that the model optimisation of 7-day average NO2 concentrations using AQMesh readings as well as reference data affects concentration contours, giving a general reduction, but increase in some areas. The study shows the potential to achieve a higher level of local air quality accuracy from this combined approach.

The CERC study uses near real-time NO2 data from 20 AQMesh pods and 5 reference stations across Cambridge, UK over three months. The presentation acknowledged the potential from large networks of low cost sensors installed across a city: accuracy and reliability is generally lower than reference monitors, but larger spatial coverage is possible. The study addressed how these sensor data can best be used in modelling. See the full presentation here.

It is important to distinguish between small air quality sensors and sensor systems. The best sensor systems offer optimisation of sensor output through quality control, platform design and sensor output processing and correction for cross-gas effects and environmental effects. Teams which want to invest in similar air quality studies or city-wide monitoring projects can get a head start by using AQMesh – the most developed such system. See the Cambridge case study of latest AQMesh performance.

International air quality experts meeting at RIVM in the Netherlands in February reviewed a range of studies using small sensor systems to measure air pollution, particularly NO2 and particulate matter. Whilst highlighting the need for good characterisation of sensors and the pace of development of this new technology, discussions focused on how to make the best use of ‘low cost’ sensors.

Two speakers highlighted the ways in which a small sensor system can be characterised. The best method is by regularly co-locating with a reference station and comparing readings; another method is similar but one sensor system is co-located against reference and then moved around the other units to allow comparison. Other options include comparison with passive samplers or by comparing co-located sensor systems against each other.

AQMesh NO2, PM10 and PM2.5 readings from the Citi-Sense project (2015-16, AQMesh v3.5) – a superceded version of AQMesh without standard sensor quality control or characterisation – were compared with maps of reference data using data fusion and showed encouraging results. An even earlier AQMesh project in Asia (2014, AQMesh v3.0) compared source apportionment plots generated using reference data to those from co-located AQMesh pods and the conclusions to be drawn about pollution sources were the same.

AQMesh continues to build on years of global studies and continued development, offering the most ‘project-ready’ small sensor system which can be used in an air quality network – including reference stations, passive samplers and modelling – to proven effect. See more information about AQMesh performance and versions.

AQMesh can also be scaled using diffusion tubes


AQMesh can be calibrated against passive samplersThe AQMesh team has carried out a test which shows that calibration (scaling) of AQMesh against one, or ideally several, diffusion tubes, is a viable option when no local reference station is available.

When three AQMesh pods and four NO2 diffusion tubes were co-located against a reference station, the diffusion tube readings were so consistent with the reference average reading for the period that the diffusion tube average could be used to apply a slope correction to AQMesh data.

By careful management of the co-location phasing it is possible to record sufficient data points to also correct any offset.

Passive samplers for key pollutants such as NO2 are widely available and are often used to reach areas not covered by more expensive and bulky reference stations. Small sensor systems or so-called ‘low cost’ sensor systems can help to fill the data gap between reference real-time readings, passive sampling single average measurements and model output. Calibration of small sensors systems, such as AQMesh, against certified and validated measurements provides a trail of data validity.

Click here to see more detail about scaling AQMesh against diffusion tubes. We can also supply a user guide on request – please contact us.

AQMesh demonstrates legitimacy of small sensors for air quality in Cambridge

At the RSC AAMG event on ‘Air Quality Monitoring: Evolving Issues and New Technologies’ Professor Rod Jones of the University of Cambridge presented a paper showing very encouraging results. “Because we know that all the pods read the same and because we have a comparison between one pod and a reference instrument we can say that all pods are working equivalently across the city. What we are seeing is correspondences in excess of 0.7, 0.8, against reference and that is very good for straight out of the box”, commented Professor Jones.

These findings are from a project in Cambridge where 20 pods, initially co-located at the AQMesh UK factory, were placed at key points around Cambridge. The objective was to demonstrate what could be shown about ambient air quality at key points in the city, using a larger number of measurement nodes to understand how air quality varies across the city, particularly in relation to key transport corridors and areas of construction activity.

The 20 AQMesh pods measure gases (NO, NO2, O3, CO and SO2, particulate matter (PM1, PM2.5 and PM10) and environmental conditions (atmospheric pressure, relative humidity and pod temperature). 19 of the pods are powered by lithium battery and have been gathering data at 15 minute reading averages since June 2016, without any need to visit the sites to change batteries or carry out maintenance. The twentieth pod is currently running at one minute reading intervals, mounted at a Cambridge City Centre reference station, using a high capacity lithium battery. Each pod is small enough to be easily mounted to a post, wall or enclosure and all pods have been functioning without fault throughout the project.

As part of the project, data has also been pushed directly from the AQMesh server to a University of Cambridge server where it is automatically displayed in near real time. A further aspect of this initial project is to compare collected AQMesh data with ADMS-Urban modelled data for the same area and then use the real-time AQMesh data to improve the airTEXT air quality forecasts for Cambridge.

The next steps are to calibrate the pods and to analyse the data in more detail. Co-locating one of the pods with the reference station has allowed slope and offset values to be calculated, as all pods had already been co-located, allowing the same scaling to be applied to all pods. These values can then be applied to the AQMesh server, improving the accuracy of all data gathered after that point. Initial analysis using wind rose plots has shown the extent to which pollution can be attributed to local road traffic at each point. Further analysis of data will show how pollution varies across the locations and by time of day or week.

Read the full paper here.

Watch the video here.

Find out more about the Cambridge Smart City project here. See the brochure – AQMesh photo on page 5 and AQMesh performance comments on page 11.

Read Professor Rod Jones’ May 2017 IAPSC presentation on small sensor deployment here.

AQMesh performance proven in independent study of air quality sensor systems

The Assessment of Air Quality Microsensors verses reference methods: The EuNetAir joint exercise has recently been published, and shows an R2 against for reference for AQMesh of >0.8 for NO2.

Read the full study here.

EuNetAir is the European Network on New Sensing Technologies for Air Pollution Control and Environmental Sustainability, working towards European-wide air quality control standards.

More about EuNetAir.

The challenges and benefits of local air quality monitoring

A new generation of air quality monitors is now being offered to provide localised, real-time air quality readings – but the potential benefit is only just starting to be realised.

It is generally accepted that whilst measurements from air quality reference stations are highly accurate, they are not sufficiently location-specific. Key pollutants – such as NO2 and PM2.5 – vary dramatically over short distances and time intervals, but the large size, maintenance requirements and relatively high cost of reference equipment limits the places it can be installed. Diffusion tubes can offer a very cheap alternative and are much easier to install in specific locations, however they only offer a single reading over a number of weeks, and air quality professionals therefore rely on modelling techniques to fill the gaps. With research continuing to prove the extent to which air pollution varies significantly over space and time, the answer would be a reliable and accurate tool for taking real-time, localised measurements.

A number of new low-cost air quality monitoring systems are available, each with benefits and shortcomings. It is fair to say that the available sensors, whether electrochemical, optical or metal oxide, are all working at or close to their limit of detection to provide the low ppb or µg/m3 level of sensitivity required for any of the common ambient air quality applications. However, several systems offered for these applications provide readings in ppm or even % level readings – which clearly makes them inappropriate for ambient air monitoring. Some are also not fit for long-term outdoor use, as they are not fully weather proof or cannot cope with the expected temperature ranges. However, at least one system – AQMesh – does operate across a wide range of conditions and territories, so having established that a viable product exists, can it deliver the accuracy required?

Performance is clearly a major consideration for any user and comparing readings from a lower cost system against a reference station is the obvious place to start. One immediate challenge is ensuring meaningful results. Particularly in roadside applications or where there is an immediate source of pollution, all sensors and intakes must be within a metre of each other and at an equal distance from the immediate source. Most sensors, not unreasonably, also require an uninterrupted air flow around them – mounting immediately above hot or wet surfaces will not give accurate readings. On the other hand, some limitations of reference equipment come to the fore when comparing with a different type of measurement. For example, single channel NOx analysers switch between measuring NO and NOx, calculating NO2 as the difference. This switching can have dramatic effects on readings for the two gases (which are measured separately and directly by other sensors) at short reading intervals, such as 1 minute. Similarly, any differences in clock synchronisation or reading averaging protocol (time beginning or time ending) can make the difference between a regression comparison R2 of 0.9 and 0.1, which can render comparisons meaningless.

Comparisons of particulate measurements are also problematic due to the range of reference-equivalent methods available and the limitations, in many ways, of the reference method itself. Since the expanded uncertainty of the reference equivalent measurements for PM10 and PM2.5 allows up to 25%, this should be borne in mind when making comparisons with lower cost particulate sensors. Overall, for both gases and particulate matter, if several identical low cost systems are co-located, the user should expect a high level of repeatability (R2 > 0.9) and should expect to be able to adjust accuracy by ‘calibrating’ – adjusting slope and offset – against a co-located reference/equivalent station. Some systems, such as AQMesh, then allow this scaling adjustment to be applied automatically to all future readings, minimising the need for manual data correction. Access to a calibrated reference station and careful co-location is currently key to getting value out of any of the current generation of emerging sensor systems, although the objective of good accuracy without the need for a reference station is being actively pursued.

About AQMeshCalibration through co-location

First questions about these systems often include ‘How do I run gas through it to calibrate it?’ and ‘Can I calibrate (or test) it in the laboratory?’ In systems such as AQMesh the air sample is not pumped, for good power-saving reasons (low power is essential for battery operation), and so it is not obvious how a conventional gas calibration would work. More importantly, although the sensors generally do give very good results in laboratory tests with known dry, single gases, these bear no relation to real ambient field measurements with a combination of damp, humid gases at potentially varying temperature and pressure. Overall, there is no proven substitute for co-location with a reference station. Even with all of these considerations, some of these small, lower cost air quality systems, such as AQMesh, can deliver very impressive comparison results and provide a new source of air quality data. Those with in-built power and communications offer genuine freedom to gather measurements from any location and research teams worldwide are using such systems to understand pollution around cities, inside and outside buildings, at different heights, in street canyons, around industrial facilities and within neighbourhoods, at different times of day, and so on. This new granularity of measurement and flexibility of location gives air quality management teams a real tool to carry out ‘before and after’ studies and evaluate a range of policy or pollution mitigation activities. Where a number of sensor systems are used, and particularly in combination with wind speed and direction information, the relative measurements and source distribution can provide very powerful insights about where to target pollution mitigation activity.

One such low cost outdoor air quality monitoring system offering this type of flexibility is AQMesh, which has proven its repeatability, accuracy and performance through a series of these careful co-location comparisons with calibrated reference stations in a variety of global locations and applications. The small size, battery power and wireless communications technology mean users can benefit from reliable and accurate real-time, localised air quality measurements in a broad range of studies.

How accurate is ‘accurate’?

One area of discussion is what level of accuracy is ‘good enough’. Although this depends on the application, it is still tempting to look for a very high level of agreement between the low cost sensor system and reference equipment. Whilst this may be the goal, the lower cost systems are considerably cheaper and have the benefit of being correctly located so perhaps it is better to have slightly less accurate readings from the right location than highly accurate readings from the wrong location? For some applications it is really only the relative readings which are required, and systems like AQMesh provide very high levels of precision between identical systems. Or it may only be appropriate to provide a ‘traffic light’ indication for communicating air quality to the public. Until more general guidance is available, users will have to take a view on accuracy relevant to their application.

Publishing air quality data

Another area of confusion is regarding data privacy vs online publication of air quality data. Most of the new air quality systems take advantage of remote data management and online access. This makes sense for a number of reasons. Hard-wired communications infrastructure is a barrier to freedom of location and new systems generally communicate either using the mobile network, radio or wi-fi. Online access to data is also very convenient and less resource hungry. Few of us who readily use mobile phones, online banking and many of the commonplace applications of modern life fully understand security of communications and the reality of data hosting. The bottom line is that air quality data from sensor systems using wireless communications can be as secure as any other online application. Confusion is caused by the systems which are focused on citizen engagement and offer automated sharing and publication of data, but these are the exception and in most cases, such as AQMesh, data is private and secure.

The new generationAQMesh pod

Current low cost air quality sensor systems are a very mixed bag. Some products may well appear to offer the same measurements and even claimed accuracy as the more thoroughly developed and tested systems and the user has little choice but to ask searching questions and ask for demonstration of performance and reference projects before purchasing. But the need for such systems is clear and performance is already good enough for many leading institutions and organisations to be actively using the technology. Sensor and sensor system manufacturers are seizing on every new shared comparison dataset and development in technology to make further improvements. The insights that these sensor systems can offer are real and relevant and there is no substitute for trying the technology in any given application to see what it can offer. Many users have found that one insight can lead to another and, working with a clear understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the systems, the benefits of making a start with this new tool are overwhelming.

AQMesh co-location comparison trial in Colorado, USA

During the months of October 2015 through to February 2016, two AQMesh pods were co-located against reference in Boulder, Colorado (USA), focusing on NO, NO2, O3 and CO measurement.

The trial resulted in impressively high correlation between AQMesh units and reference equipment, in some cases delivering R2 values higher than 0.98 (NO) and 0.87 (NO2).

Results of the trial have now been published in this full in-depth report, available to view or download as PDF.

Colorado-co-location-trial-results-news-image-1024x611
Example NO results from the trial

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